You can eat romaine again; CDC: tainted lettuce likely gone

Romaine lettuce outbreak has spread to 32 states

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The FDA has determined that the last shipments of romaine lettuce from the Yuma area were harvested on April 16, 2018. It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma area still is available in people's homes, stores or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life. Most people recover within a week, but some illnesses can last longer and be more severe. The patient age range is still from age 1 to 88.

- Although more states are reporting cases of people sickened by tainted romaine lettuce, the CDC implied that romaine is probably safe to eat again. Iowa and OR also reported their first lettuce-related E. coli cases in the past week.

This nasty outbreak has infected 172 people across 32 states, according to the CDC.

"This is a higher hospitalization rate than usual for E. coli O157:H7 infections, which is usually around 30 percent", the agency noted. This takes an average of two to three weeks.

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The person who was sick consumed lettuce at several locations.

Stan Park, the operations director of Brandeis Sodexo, verified in an email to the Justice that the food service provider received written confirmation from Russo's, their produce supplier, that Brandeis' romaine comes from Salinas Valley, California instead of Yuma, Arizona.

This investigation is ongoing and health officials will provide more information as it becomes available.

Romaine lettuce has a shelf life of about 21 days.

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Romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region, linked to dozens of infections caused by a strain of E. coli is likely no longer being sold in stores or served in restaurants, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC stressed that E. coli illness can be very serious, even deadly.

"It's a person who apparently eats a lot of lettuce", he said.

The symptoms of a potentially deadly E. coli O157:H7 infection include severe and painful abdominal and stomach cramps, and diarrhea that is watery or bloody.

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