Facebook Closes 583 Fake Accounts

Representative image | AP

Representative image | AP

The full Facebook report is available online and details both Facebook's commitment to their content values as well as some more metrics regarding the deletion of 583 million fake Facebook accounts and harsher crack down on the various offending content.

Facebook had last month published its internal guidelines to review posts for hate speech, violence, nudity, terrorism, and other content that don't conform to its "community standards".

This, Rosen says, is in addition to the millions of fake accounts that are blocked from registering on a daily basis yet even still, it is estimated that as many as four percent of the active Facebook accounts during the quarter were still fake. He said removing fake accounts is the key to combating that type of content.

"Thanks to AI tools we've built, nearly all of the spam was removed before anyone reported it, and most of the fake accounts were removed within minutes of being registered", Zuckerberg says in his post, adding that Facebook is working on getting its AI better to effectively remove more linguistically nuanced issues like hate speech in different languages.

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Why the numbers matter: The report gives us a picture of the sheer quantity of content Facebook's software and human moderators are churning through. Cleaning up the social network is an important factor in the calculus of Facebook's ad-heavy business moving forward.

The increased transparency comes as the Menlo Park, California, company tries to make amends for a privacy scandal triggered by loose policies that allowed a data-mining company with ties to President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign to harvest personal information on about 87 million users.

To distinguish the many shades of offensive content, Facebook separates them into categories: graphic violence, adult nudity/sexual activity, terrorist propaganda, hate speech, spam and fake accounts.

In the first three months of the year 2018, Facebook claims to have taken down 837 million pieces of spam and disabled 583 million fake accounts, and a lot of them before being reported.

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Nevertheless, the company took down nearly twice as much content in both segments during this year's first quarter, compared with Q4.

Facebook took down 837 million pieces of spam in Q1 2018.

Facebook's technology is good at removing nudity and violence, but not at removing hate speech.

For hate speech, Facebook's human reviewers and computer algorithms identified just 38 percent of the violations.

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In 85.6 percent of the cases, Facebook detected the images before being alerted to them by users, said the report, issued the day after the company said about 200 apps had been suspended on its platform as part of an investigation into misuse of private user data. But, as Schultz made clear, none of this is complete. "And it's created to make it easy for scholars, policymakers and community groups to give us feedback so that we can do better over time".

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