Illinois Girl, 11, Can Take Medical Marijuana at School, Judge Agrees

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Girl should be allowed to take medical marijuana at school: suit

Ashley received treatments and a "substantial" amount of traditional medications to treat her seizures, but they were not successful, and the child's treating physicians have certified her as being qualified to receive medical marijuana to treat her epilepsy, the suit stated.

The parents of an 11-year-old girl battling leukemia are suing their IL school district to allow their daughter to take medical marijuana at school. Now she's in remission but, as a result, suffers from epilepsy and seizures. Sometimes she uses "cannabis oil drops" on her tongue or wrists. The girl's attorney, Steve Glink, told The Chicago Tribune that since taking the medical marijuana, the elementary school student has fewer seizures and is better able to focus and learn.

'Her ability, her behavior in general, her whole character, her wellness is completely different.

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School district officials said they will administer cannabis to the sixth grader until they get further clarification from the attorney general.

IL passed a medical marijuana law in 2014, but the statute prohibits the consumption or possession of cannabis on public school property.

The Chicago Tribune reports plaintiffs of the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court, who are identified by initials, contend the state's ban on taking the drug at school is unconstitutional.

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Ashley has missed several weeks of school, according to her parents.

The family wants a preliminary order that would allow her to wear the patch and get the cannabis oil drops, USA Today reported.

The Illinois Attorney General agreed not to prosecute and the school district said its goal was to have Ashley back in the classroom with no legal consequences for staff who administer the medicine.

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Superintendent Andy DuRoss said officials were working to accommodate the girl as best they could within the law - but added the school would comply with whatever the court ruled. "But we can not legally grant the request that was made due to the rules of the IL medical cannabis act".

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